I wasn’t the best at rolling sleeves in my time, wasn’t the worst either, probably right around the middle of the pack. Leading that pack from Guatemala, though, is their marine corps commandant. Seriously, those rolls are so sharp, they probably outmatch half the Marines in the Corps. Col. Medardo Monterroso Suarez is so pumped about U.S. Marines training his troops that he not only wants to completely adopt their doctrine, but apparently their uniform presentation as well. Recently, we sent Marine Corps Times reporter Gina Harkins and staff photographer Mike Morones down into the heart of Central America to…

Just last month, the Marine Corps executed a carefully planned pullout from Sangin district in Afghanistan’s Helmand province, a region best known as one of the most deadly battlegrounds of the war. I was on the ground with some of the units for the final withdrawal. Less than two months on, the news out of Sangin isn’t good: AP reports that some 27 people, including five civilians, have been killed since Sunday, when the Taliban launched an attack on police checkpoints in the district, swarming the region with between 800 and 1,0o0 enemy fighters. The fighting has also spread the…

The Corps is once again looking for a few good Marines willing to make a lateral move into a community that sometimes allows them to grow out a beard, ditch the high-and-tight and work undercover. First-term Marines are being solicited to join the 0211 counterintelligence/human intelligence specialist military occupation specialty. Intel is considered a high-demand, low-density military occupational specialty, one for which officials consistently dangle plump re-enlistment bonuses in front of Marines willing to change MOSs. For Marines who go intel, it could mean a bonus of $45,500. Last year, Marine Corps Times wrote this cover story lifting the veil on the somewhat…

Edit: It has been brought to our attention that recent Army MOH recipient Kyle White began the tradition of live online Q-and-As earlier this year. Kyle Carpenter participated in the first of these events for the Marine Corps, though. We’ve updated this post to reflect that. Marine Corps hero Kyle Carpenter made a bit of history today, conducting what  is the first-ever live online Q-and-A with a Marine selected to receive the military’s top honor. He’ll receive the Medal of Honor Thursday in a ceremony at the White House, nearly four years after covering a live grenade to save a…

Right now, future Medal of Honor recipient Kyle Carpenter is holding an AMA-style session over at the Marines Facebook page, inviting users to send in their questions over the next hour so he can answer them in real time. Carpenter will receive the military’s highest honor Thursday for shielding a friend from a live grenade in 2012. Why is this incredibly cool? First, Carpenter will be one of only two living Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipients from the post 9/11 era. This is a big piece of Marine Corps history. Second, hearing from a living hero of this caliber…

The near-unanimous lament coming from troops, widows, and Gold Star mothers would be hard not to hear if the sound of Iraq imploding wasn’t so deafening. One wife, whose husband went twice to Iraq, summed it up to Military Times nicely when Mosul was taken: “What a waste.” When Fallujah fell to ISIS militants last year, Business Insider defense writer Paul Szoldra, wrote “Tell me again, why did my friends die in Iraq?” His write-up got immediate attention, with members of the media even asking Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno if he had read it. (Skip to the 15-minute mark…

Marine veteran Kyle Carpenter will become the newest recipient of the Medal of Honor in a ceremony at the White House June 19 for covering a grenade to save a friend during his 2012 deployment to Marjah, Afghanistan. In anticipation of that event, the Marine Corps has released a beautiful new video showing Carpenter and his mom, Robin Carpenter, poring over old letters from boot camp and Carpenter’s deployment to Afghanistan prior to his act of heroism and the life-changing injuries that resulted. At seven minutes, the video’s a little long, but completely worth the watch. Be sure to stay…

A Marine veteran who earned the Navy Cross for actions in Iraq but later refused it, filed a complaint with the federal government alleging treatment by a ranger at a national park in California could result in the loss of his leg, which was damaged when he stepped on an IED. Dominic Esquibel, who served with 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, was awarded the nation’s second highest valor award for braving enemy machine gunfire three times to save two fellow Marines during Operation Phantom Fury. Esquibel declined the Navy Cross.  Seven years later, he stepped on an explosive device in Afghanistan, which tore…

Conservative commentator and author Oliver North is making waves this morning with a provocative tweet. The decorated former Marine lieutenant colonel, perhaps best known for his role in the Iran-Contra scandal in the latter half of the 1980s, sent out to his 20,000 followers a picture of himself sending documents into a giant shredder. [HTML1] The image is an allusion to Iran-Contra. North publicly admitted to shredding documents related to his work in Iran, including the covert sale of weapons to that country. The incident would eventually lead to the end of his military career in 1988. But North has…

Above the debate churning around the Bowe Bergdahl saga seems to be the notion that the U.S. should always seek to bring every service member home. Not so fast, says one former commandant. In an appearance this weekend on Fox News, retired Gen. James T. Conway talked about the recently recovered soldier and all the context surrounding his return to the U.S. Bergdahl had been in the hands of the Haqqani network of the Taliban ever since he had wandered off base five years ago. Reports and evidence suggest he left of his own will, investigations have yet to determine…

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