Browsing: The CMC

When he crossed the finish line at the Marine Corps Marathon Oct. 31 with a time of 2:24:08, 1st Lt. Sean Barrett got a good old hand slap from Gen. Jim Amos, the new commandant of the Marine Corps. Barrett was the first Marine to finish the 35th annual race, trailing top winner Air Force 2nd Lt. Jacob Bradosky by about a minute. Bradosky won the marathon with a time of 2:23:30.

In this week’s print edition, details of what the first aviator to head the Corps, Gen. Jim Amos, has in store for you and the Marine Corps over the next four years. There’s a lot of attention paid to the big stuff like equipment, training and fossil fuel, but we’ve pulled out the information that matters most to the individual Marine and it’s clear that Amos wants to make sure Marines and their families are taken care of. His TOP priority, without a doubt, is to make sure everyone’s got what they need for the fight in Afghanistan. Related to…

The Passage of the Commandants ceremony this morning has resulted in a passing of the guard, with retiring Commandant Gen. James Conway handing over the reigns of the Marine Corps to Gen. James Amos. The ceremony also means something else, however: The unveiling of the outgoing commandant’s portrait. For the last four years, Conway has lived in the Home of the Commandants, one of the oldest public buildings in all of Washington. Nestled into a corner of Marine Barracks Washington’s grounds, it was built in 1806, and has served as home to all but two of the Corps’ top officers,…

It goes without saying at this point that the Marine Corps is facing a changing environment, both tactically and politically. It’s obvious in many ways, from the way the Corps recently launched its first assault on pirates in years to the hard realities Marine officials are considering right now as part of a force structure review. With that in mind, Marine Corps Times presents this week “Guide to a Changing Corps,” a special report that assesses that state of the Marine Corps and what it faces next. It features exclusive interviews with the following, as Marine leadership seeks to set…

Marine forces formally took over Sangin yesterday, assuming control of the former Taliban stronghold in southern Afghanistan from Great Britain’s 40 Commando, a Royal Marine unit that has been patrolling the area for months. The change is significant, even if it has received only limited attention in the U.S. mainstream media. The Brits are leaving Sangin, in northern Helmand province, after four years and 106 deaths — 36 of which occurred this year, according to a Daily Mail report out today. Their struggles to establish and maintain security in the district of about 50,000 people has contributed to growing discontent…

This week’s Marine Corps Times cover story reintroduces Marines with someone who many of them know well: Sgt. Maj. Carlton Kent, the service’s top enlisted adviser. In a 40-minute interview last week in his Pentagon office, Kent sounded off on a variety of topics, including drawdown fears in the Corps and what recommendations senior enlisted Marines pushed up to Commandant Gen. James Conway this year after the 2010 Sergeants Major Symposium, held this summer in National Harbor, Md. Historically, suggestions made out of the symposium have a way of finding their way into Marine Corps policy, so it would hardly…

The American Red Cross will recognize Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Conway on Oct. 16 with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Forty years ago he was commissioned as an officer in the United States Marine Corps, which was probably before most Marines in the Corps today were even born, and he’s been leading Marines ever since. The award will be presented at the Fire and Ice Ball in Washington, D.C., the American Red Cross National Capital Region’s 2010 annual gala, which this year will pay tribute to the armed forces and their families. There’s a chance that by Oct.…

It had to come sometime. After four years of leading the Marine Corps in wartime, Commandant Gen. James Conway is making what will likely be his final trip to Afghanistan this week. He touched down at Bagram Airfield on Tuesday, and if he and his traveling party haven’t already made it to Camp Leatherneck, the Corps’ major hub of operations in Afghanistan, they’ll likely be there soon. For security reasons, their agenda is classified. However, it’s likely they’ll tour much of the area. This brief account in the Pakistani media also reports that Conway visited today with Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the…

When it comes to the movers and shakers in the Marine Corps, they virtually all will visit the same event this week: the Marine Corps Sergeants Major Symposium in National Harbor, Md. An annual gathering of the service’s most senior enlisted advisers, the symposium frequently leads to recommendations that affect change in the service. Led by Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Carlton Kent, it traditionally pushes up a handful of suggestion to the commandant each year. Many of those have made their way into Marine Corps policy in recent years, including a crackdown on body-fat standards, the approval of campaign…

Thursday morning, the Marine Corps will bury one of its own. Retired Maj. Gen. Fred Haynes wasn’t just any Marine, though. As a captain, he served as an operations officer for Combat Team 28, participating in the bloody Battle of Iwo Jima that resulted in nearly 7,000 U.S. combat deaths. In 1967, he served as the top operations officer of Marine forces in Vietnam. Haynes died in March, and will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery following a service at Arlington’s Fort Myer Old Post Chapel. The delay in his burial is likely the result of the time and resources…

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